Home
About this image
Results:

Stories by tags: People

Forecasting Begins01/01/1868, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
Changes in the weather were a hazard to ships in New Zealand waters, particularly ships loading or unloading in exposed anchorages. On 3 February 1868 the ships Star of Tasmania, and Water Nymph and the ketch Otago were all...
Forecast for D-Day05/06/1944, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
In Europe, the weather forecast for the invasion of France in 1944 played a crucial role in the success of the landings. Originally planned for the morning of June 5, the invasion was put on hold for 24 hours when bad weather was forecast. A window of...
Lady Barker’s Storm28/07/1867, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
The weather hazards faced by colonial farmers were dramatically demonstrated by Lady Barker’s snowstorm. One of the worst snowstorms to affect New Zealand, it struck Canterbury in 1867. Starting on July 28 it lasted almost a week. Lady Barker’s...
Getting Started: The Colonial Administration Buys First Thermometers01/01/1861, Written by: | 0 comments
Government involvement in meteorology in New Zealand started in August 1861 when the Colonial Secretary, William Fox, instructed Provincial Superintendents to establish observatories for meteorological instruments which the Colonial office would send....
Sails to Satellites: The navigators01/01/1769, Written by: John de Lisle - from 'Sails to Satellites' | 0 comments
Even before the first systematic meteorological observations were started in 1861, a large amount of weather information had been gathered about New Zealand and its surrounding seas. This came first from the early explorers, and later from visitors,...
Weather place names05/03/1864, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
There is a lot of weather tied up in New Zealand place names. The screaming northwest gales of Canterbury are celebrated with names like Windwhistle, near the Rakaia Gorge, Mount Blowhard, near Oxford, and Nervous Knob, near Castle Hill, where gusts of...
FiztRoy: inventor of the weather forecast05/03/1864, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
Robert FitzRoy is famous as captain of the Beagle on the voyage when Darwin made his discoveries, although many New Zealanders also know FitzRoy as Governor of New Zealand before George Grey. But to meteorologists, FitzRoy is famous as one of the...
Rugby Weather: Snow and the Lions05/03/1930, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
The first test between the All Blacks and the Lions in 1930 was played at Dunedin’s Carisbrook Park just after a snowstorm. Rain started in the morning then turned to snow during the curtain raiser. It became almost impossible to make out the players...
Rugby Weather: New Zealand v South Africa in the Rain17/09/1921, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
On Saturday 17 September 1921, the deciding test of the first Springbok Tour was played at Wellington’s Athletic Park. New Zealand had won the first test 13-5 at Carisbrook and South Africa the second test 9-5 at Eden Park.Unfortunately, after a...
MetService and World War II01/01/1942, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
World War II transformed the Meteorological Service from a handful of staff to 335 by war’s end. The increase of personnel began before hostilities broke out, as the government started training military pilots in anticipation of war. Meteorologists...
Women in Weather11/07/2014, Written by: Linda Stopforth | 0 comments
The first woman understood to have been accepted into the New Zealand Meteorological Service (NZMS) in Kelburn, other than in a clerical role, commenced work in 1938.  Colleen Dee (later Wilson) passed her University Entrance (Matriculation) exam at...
A Hazardous Passage24/11/2014, Written by: Erick Brenstrum | 0 comments
“Had a ver ruf day the sea running mountains high, the ship reeling to and frow like a drunkin man, chists upsetting, watter cans pots & pans tumbeling in all directions.”So wrote an immigrant named Mathieson travelling to Dunedin...
1 to 6 of 12 results